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Monthly Almanack

provided courtesy of

Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack!



 

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JUNE 2017

JULY 2017

AUGUST 2017

SEPTEMBER 2017

OCTOBER 2017

NOVEMBER 2017


DECEMBER 2017

JANUARY 2018

FEBRUARY 2018

MARCH 2018

APRIL 2018


MAY 2018

"Motherhood: All love begins and ends there"
- Robert Browning (1812—1889)

Mid-Atlantic Weather Watch: Fair, warming trend (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) with storms (9, 10, 11); showers, mainly in the northern part of the region (12, 13, 14) turning fair and warm (15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22). Storms, mainly in the south (23, 24) returning to fair and warm weather (25, 26, 27, 28); showers in the north, storms in the south (29, 30, 31)

Full Moon: May’s Full Moon occurs on Tuesday, May 29th and has traditionally been called Flower Moon (or as the Huron Indians called it, Budding Moon) because of the many flowers that start to emerge and blossom during this month. Farmers came to refer to it as Mike Moon because of the noticeable increase in milk produced by their cows as the weather starts to warm.

Special Notes: National Day of Prayer, Thursday, May 3rd was established in 1952 at the direct suggestion of Reverend Billy Graham (1918–2018) and signed into law under Ronald Reagan in 1988. Cinco de Mayo is celebrated on Saturday, May 5th. Rogation Sunday falls on May 6th, Ascension Day follows on Thursday, May 10th. The first day of Ramadan is Tuesday, May 15th, and World No Tobacco Day is on Tuesday, May 31st.

Holidays: Mothers are honored on her day, Sunday May 13th. A telephone call, a sentimental card, a nice flower arrangement, or just spending some quality time with her will make her feel special. Armed Forces Day is observed on Saturday, May 19th and Memorial Day falls on Monday, May 28th. Plan to do something special to mark the official start of the summer season with family and friends but don’t forget that this day was set aside for honoring those who have served in our military and those who are currently serving. Their service and sacrifice has protected our precious freedoms and ensures our way of life.

The Garden: Once your last frost data has passed, warm season crops can be planted. When the ground temperatures reach 70 degrees Fahrenheit, it is safe to begin planting Okra, Pumpkin, Sweet Potatoes, Eggplant, Peppers, Peanuts, Watermelon, Cow Peas, Black-eyed Peas, Crowder Peas, Butter Peas and Butter Beans. Keep a vigilante eye on the roses. Keep them sprayed for aphids and other pests and diseases such as black spot. It's still not too late to fertilize your trees and shrubs. Use a Rhododendron or Evergreen type of plant food to feed evergreens and other acid loving plants like Azaleas and Rhododendrons, Camellias and Junipers, etc. Use an all-purpose garden fertilizer (10-10-10) to feed roses, deciduous shrubs and trees. Be sure to water the fertilizer in thoroughly after it is applied.

Remove the wilting seed heads from Rhododendrons and Azaleas so that the plants energy can go to foliage growth and next year’s flowers, rather than seeds. Work lime in the soil around your Hydrangeas to produce pink flowers or Aluminum Sulphate for blue blooms. Remove any sucker growths from fruit trees as soon as they appear!

Gruber’s Thought For Today’s Living

"While the truth may be painful to hear today, the wise man will benefit from it tomorrow"

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"When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant
I could not stand to have the old man around.
But when I got to be twenty-one,
I was astonished at how much he had learned in 7 years"
Mark Twain (1836-1875)

Mid-Atlantic Weather Watch: Storms, some severe (1, 2) with fair and warm weather (3, 4, 5); storms, severe in the southern part of the region (6, 7, 8) returning to fair and warm temperatures (9, 10, 11, 12). More storms (13, 14, 15) turning fair and warm again (16, 17, 18, 19); showers, some storms again in the south (20, 21) returning to fair and very warm (22, 23, 24, 25, 26). Showers (27, 28) with fair and warm (29, 30).

Tornado Watch: The Town and Country Almanack sees possible tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region the 1st and 2nd of June.

Full Moon: June’s Full Moon will occur on Wednesday, June 27th. It has commonly been referred to as Strawberry Moon because the first strawberries of the season become ripe for the picking (and eating!) in June. And because roses start to show their gorgeous blooms at the beginning of the month, it has been also called Rose Moon.

Special Notes: Summer officially starts with the Summer Solstice that occurs on Thursday, June 21st. June is a typical month for graduations so honor your favorite student this month when he or she graduates from high school or college. This is a major milestone so mark the achievement with a special event or memorable gift.

Holidays: Honor ‘Old Glory and display it proudly on Flag Day, Thursday, June 14th, make sure you are displaying it properly. Father’s Day is Sunday, June 17th. Do something really nice for the "old man" like breakfast in bed, an outing to his favorite sports event, or a special dinner out.

The Garden: Additional pruning may be required in June of fast-growing plants, such as juniper, privet and yew. This will help promote new growth and also maintain a desirable shape during the growing season. Cut back perennials like Shasta daisy, black-eyed Susan, coneflower, and lavender after first bloom to encourage a second round of flowers in the Fall.

Cut back fuchsia, geranium, and margarite to encourage branching. Plant or sow summer annuals such as nasturtiums, vinca, verbena, geraniums, phlox, marigolds, lobelia, impatiens, cosmos, sunflowers, zinnias, and alyssum. Feed annuals and remove spent flowers to promote another round of flowers.

It’s not too late to start warm-season crops such as corn, beans, tomatoes, squash, peppers, and eggplant. Watch for insects everywhere! When you see them (and you will!), immediately wash them or pick them off plants before they can lay eggs and multiply. Use fungicide where diseases usually are a problem, especially on roses. If you cut flowers for fresh in-door arrangements early in the morning, they will stay fresher and more vibrant much longer.

Gruber’s Thought For Today’s Living

"Every person has two educations – one which he receives from others, and one more important which he gives himself"

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JUNE 2018