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Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack!



 

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"Labor Day is a glorious holiday because your child will be going back to school the next day. It would have been called Independence Day, but that name was already taken" 
       
Bill Dodds (1952-   )


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Showers, mild, (1,2); rain (warm, humid (3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10) with more showers, thunderstorms (11,12,13). Cooler, less humid (14,15); fair and milder (16,17,18). Rain (19,20,21) turning fair, very warm (22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30).

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees tropical storm and hurricane activity in the region from the 10th through the 13th and the 26th through the 28th of the month.


FULL MOON: The HARVEST MOON is the Full Moon that falls closest to the Autumnal Equinox (usually in September) at a time when the moon rises soon after sunset on several successive days. According to tradition, the extra light from the moon during that period gave the farmer more time in which to finish up his chores and bring in the harvest. In 2021, the Autumnal Equinox occurs on Wednesday, September 22nd and signals the beginning of Autumn. The Full Moon closest to that date occurs on Monday, September 20th and is therefore, 2021’s HARVEST MOON of 2021.


SPECIAL NOTES: The 2022 Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack has been available on newsstands and at popular retailers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region now since mid-July, almost a month earlier than any other year! A complete list of retail locations, go to www.almanack.com/where-to-buy-us but you can save some time by going to www.almanack.com/order, ordering your copy today, and have it delivered right to your front door! Consider taking advantage of our very popular 3-year subscription. It guarantees no price increase and will deliver The Almanack with no charge for shipping for the next 3 years. Or become a Friend of The Almanack (FOTA), get immediate access to our new on-line digital version as well as THE NEXT EDITION, receive a hardcopy of the current edition, access to past digital editions, and so much more! Check it out at www.almanack.com/specials). Great deals for a great almanac!


HOLIDAYS: Labor Day falls on the first Monday of the month which is September 6th in 2021. On September 11th, 2001, America was attacked like never before and has never been the same since. We must honor those who perished then on Saturday, September 11th. And we must never forget to honor all of the brave first-responders who also perished trying to minimize the loss of life. Citizenship Day is observed on Friday, September 17th, Rosh Hashana begins on Tuesday, September 7th and Yom Kippur begins on Friday, September 16th, both at sunset.          


THE GARDEN: Fall is a great time to plant and divide perennials and shrubs for next year's garden. By planting in the fall, your plants do not endure the stressful summer heat during establishment and have time to form sufficient root systems before the onset of winter dormancy. Don't retire the lawn mower when the growth of your lawn slows down this fall. As long as the grass continues to grow, you should continue to mow it. You can help leaves break down more easily by running the lawn mower back and forth over the pile. Put the shredded leaves directly onto the garden or compost pile.


THE FARM: Best days for planting root crops (24,25); weeding and stirring the soil (4,5); planting above-ground crops (10,11); harvesting all crops (17,18); best days for setting hens and incubators (14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (6,7,8,9,10,11,12); transplanting (6,7,8,9,10,11,12); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20); the harvesting and storing of grains (1,2,3,4,5,28,29,30);


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING


“A classroom is not the only place where a person can learn”



SEPTEMBER 2021

“The trees are in their autumn beauty, The woodland paths are dry,          Under the October twilight the water Mirrors a still sky.”

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Dry, very warm (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8) with STORMS (9,10,11,12); dry and warm again (13,14,15,16,17,18,18,20,21) with rain, then breezy and cooler (22,23). Hard freeze in the northern part of the region, fair, turning milder (24,25,26,27); occasional showers (28,29) turning fair (30,31).   


SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees severe thunderstorms in the region on 11th and the hard freeze hitting on the 24-25.

FULL MOON: October’s FULL MOON will occur on October 20th and is the HUNTER’S MOON of 2021. Named because of the extra light it provided many Native Americans, extending their hunt for food well into the early evening. It was also referred to as and YELLOW LEAF and FALLING LEAVES by the Cree Tribe because of the many leaves turning that color and that most of the trees lose the last of their leaves during the month.

HOLIDAYS: Columbus Day is observed on Monday, October 11th, United Nations Day is celebrated on Sunday, the 24th, and Halloween falls on Sunday, October 31st.

SPECIAL NOTES: Hopefully, most of our readers have been fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and following local guidelines to protect yourself and others but be sure to remember to get your annual flu shots. October is Fire Prevention Month. In 1922, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) named the second week of October Fire Prevention Week in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. Today, we celebrate Fire Prevention Week and Month by raising fire safety awareness and educating families, students and communities across the United States. During this month, fire departments provide education to their communities, and encourage parents and loved ones to practice fire safety and whole home safety. Have an evacuation plan ready with your family and check smoke detector batteries often

THE GARDEN: Mulching fall planted perennials will keep the soil warmer longer, allowing root growth to continue, however, the plants do need time to harden off for winter. Spread a thin layer of mulch after fall planting, and then add a thicker layer once the ground has frozen. Shredding leaves, along with lawn clippings, dead plant stalks from the vegetable garden make a fine addition to the compost heap. And try this simply trick: remove all large vines and spent plants from the vegetable garden. Mix 1 can of cola (not diet), 1 cup of dish soap, and ¼ cup of ammonia and add to 20-gallon hose end sprayer and fill to top. Saturate the layer of mulch that’s left on top of the garden’s soil and then say, “Good Night” until the next growing season!

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (21,22); weeding and stirring the soil (1,2,3,4,5)1,12); planting above-ground crops (8,9); harvesting all crops (18,19,20); the best days for setting hens and incubators (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (6,7,8,9,10,11); transplanting (6,7,8,9,10,21,22); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27); harvesting and storing grains (1,2,3,4,5,28,29,30,31).  

 J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“The time to make friends is before you need them.”



OCTOBER 2021

“November’s sky is chill and drear, November’s leaf is red and sear” 
Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair (1,2,3,4) with showers, thunderstorms (5,6,7,8); windy then colder with hard freeze in the southern part of the region (7,8), turning fair and mild (9,10). Breezy, rain, turning cold snow in the west (11,12) turning fair cold with frost (13,14); fair turning milder (15,16,17,18) with rain, snow in the west, brisk and colder (19,20,21,22). Breezy, flurries in the west (23) fair and milder (24,25,26,27) again, breezy rain (28) turning fair and colder, flurries in the west (29,30).

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: Thunderstorms, high winds (5,6,7); hard freeze (8) heavy snow wind in the western part of the region (11,12), heavy snow (22).


FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in November will occur on Saturday, November 18th. With the leaves falling and grasses dying off, it has been referred to as FALLING LEAF MOON and DYING GRASS MOON. And because of the high winds sweeping through across The Plains, many in that region called it BIG WIND MOON.


SPECIAL NOTES: The 2021 elections will be held on Tuesday, November 2nd and this year, even though we are not electing President of The United States, your vote is needed to help maintain the course of America for the future. If voting by mail, complete your ballot immediately upon receipt and place the properly-completed ballot into a legitimate drop box in your area or mail as early as possible. And remember…. Daylight Savings ends for 2021 on Sunday, November 7th at 2AM. Be sure to turn the clocks back an hour before retiring Saturday evening.


HOLIDAYS: Veteran’s Day falls on Thursday, November 11th in 2021. Remember to honor our military service branches and those have served and with their service, continue to protect us today. Thanksgiving is celebrated on Thursday, November 25th. Join with family and friends and reflect on all of those things we have to be thankful for and please, try to carry that appreciation not only throughout the holiday season, but for always! And though not officially recognized as a holiday, Wednesday, November 10th is the great civil rights leader, Martin Luther King’s actual birthday.


THE GARDEN: Keep all of your plants well-watered going into late fall and winter. Pay particular attention to any plants or shrubs recently planted. Plants that face winter dryness are prone to damage and dieback during the cooler months. The trick is to water deeply and less often in order to establish self-sufficient plants. As soon as the leaves fall from fruit trees, shade or flowering trees, raspberries and other deciduous plants, they can be sprayed for the first time with a dormant spray. This spraying helps control over-wintering insects and diseases. Apply according to label instructions. Winter heating dries the air out in your home considerably. Help your house plants survive by misting them or placing the pots on a pebble filled tray of water to ensure adequate humidity and moisture.

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (2,3, 29,30); weeding and stirring the soil (1,26,26); harvesting all crops (15,16); the best days for setting hens and incubators (4,5,6,7,8,9,10); 11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (4,5,6,7,88,9,10); transplanting (4,5,6,7,8,9,10); the weaning of small animals and livestock (6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14); the harvesting and storing grains (1,2,3,27,28,29,30); 19,20,21,22,23,24,25).


JOHN GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“Before you insist upon being making yourself heard, make sure you have something of importance to say”



NOVEMBER 2021

“But I heard him exclaim ‘ere he drove out of sight,
   'Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!’

Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863)



MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair, turning milder (1,2,3); snow, rain east (3,4,5); windy at first, then dry but cold (6,7); rain, light snow central and west (8,9,10,11); fair, cool (12,13,14,15,16); 17-19 rain, snow central and west (17,18,19); fair, breezy, colder (20,21); fair, milder (22,23,24 25,26,27,28,29); rain, breezy (30,31).


SEVERE WEATER WATCH: Possible heavy snow (4,5); high winds (6,7,8); more heavy snow possible (17,18,19).


FULL MOON: December ‘s full moon falls on the 18th and because of the lower temperatures during the month, has been called COLD MOON by many Native American tribes. Other tribes noticed the beavers scurrying to finish building their dams and lodges before the lakes and ponds begin to ice over, called it ICE-FORMING MOON and BEAVER MOON. 


SPECIAL NOTES: Winter Solstice will occur on Tuesday, December 21st. Remember that The Almanack makes a great gift that keeps giving throughout the year! Go to www.almanack.com/order, order a holiday copy or two (or three or four!), and this year, consider including a nifty THE ALMANACK KNOWS WHICH WAY THE WIND BLOWS! sweatshirt or tee under the tree. Go to www.bonfire.com/the-almanack-knows, check out the styles and colors, and order one today.


HOLIDAYS: Christmas is celebrated on Saturday, December 25th, and Kwanzaa begins on Sunday, December 26th. Enjoy family and friends during these festive times and keep that joyful and giving spirit alive throughout the coming year. Everyone at The Hagerstown Town & Country Almanack wishes everyone the happiest of holidays and again, pledges to its loyal readers (and followers on social media!) to continue to inform, inspire, and entertain as it has done for the past 226 years! New Year’s Eve falls on Friday, December 31st. Plan and enjoy a safe, family-oriented evening of fun, food, and entertainment on the very first night of the year.  Look online at www.firstnight.com/cities to find a First Night Celebration nearest you.


THE GARDEN: Live Christmas trees are still a tradition in some homes. Check its freshness by tapping the branches. Very few needles should fall. Stroke the branches to make sure the needles are resilient and not brittle, have an aromatic fragrance, and good green color for the species. Before bringing the tree indoors, cut 1-inch off the bottom before placing in the water receptacle, and fill it with ½ cup regular 7-up plus 1 quart water or tree. And if you need holiday greenery, grab your shears and head for the back yard. If you are lucky, you will have a variety of boxwoods, yew, fir, or a variety of pine trees to choose from. If you are really lucky, you may even have a holly tree!


THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (27,28); weeding and stirring the soil (22,23); planting above-ground crops (10,11,19,20); harvesting all crops (12,13); the best days for setting hens and incubators (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,9,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (4,5); transplanting (4,5,16,7,8,9); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11); harvesting and storing grains (31).


 J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 
“To give the gift of yourself is perhaps the most precious gift of all”



DECEMBER 2021


“Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring out the false, ring in the true"

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)



MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Snow, rain, wintry mix (1,2,3,4,50; fair breezy, cold at first (6,7,8. More snow and wintery mix (9,10,11) turning milder with scattered rain showers (12,13,14); flurries, snow showers in the western part of the region (15,16. Fair, breezy colder (17). Seasonably cold, occasional flurries and breezy (19,19,20,21,22,23,24) turning fair and cold again, cold at first (25,26,27,28,29); heavy snow, mix east, then windy (30,31).


SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: Wintry mix (1-5) with heavy snow, wintry mix and high winds (30-31). 

FULL MOON: The first FULL MOON of 2022 will occur on Monday, January 17th. It has been called WOLF MOON by many Native American tribes because of the increased boldness of wolf packs venturing closer and closer to their camps looking for food. Other tribes called it HUNGER MOON because of the scarcity of game at this time of year. 

SPECIAL NOTES: The 2022 Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack is its 226th edition. It has been continuously published since it first appeared in 1797 and while it is the second oldest almanac in the United States, it is the ONLY almanac in America that is still published by heirs of its founder, John Gruber. Both he and his partner and son-in-law, Daniel May, would be proud to see their almanac continuing to provide even more refined weather forecasts and astronomical data vital to agricultural success in the region. It is our commitment to continue improving our look, the accuracy of our weather forecasts, and offering useful information and inspiration to help one survive in today’s world. 

HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day falls on Saturday, January 1st. Martin Luther King, Jr., famed civil rights activist leader, was born on January 15, 1929. His birthday is celebrated on the third Monday of the month. In 2022, that is Monday, January 17th. This great leader will be forever remembered for the social changes he brought about in this country and for the ultimate sacrifice he made pursuing unity and racial harmony which still eludes us today. 

THE GARDEN: Mulch landscape beds for winter if you haven't already (and if the weather allows). Mulching prevents erosion, protects against soil You can even recycle your cut Christmas tree and use the branches to cover perennials! Begin planning your garden now. Buy an extra wall calendar and dedicate it to tilling and planting activities. Look ahead and record the last projected frost dates for your region and mark down when to plant seedlings indoor. Check out this useful website www. usna.usda.gov/Hardzone to determine local hardiness. 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (23,24); weeding and stirring the soil (18,19,20); planting above-ground crops (6,7); harvesting all crops (27,28); the best days for setting hens and incubators (10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (2,3,4,5,6,7,8); transplanting (2,3,4,5,6,7,8); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,27,28,29,30,31); harvesting and storing grains (1,25,26,27,28,29,30,31). 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

“Resolutions are only as good as the intent to keep them”



JANUARY 2022

“The groundhog is like most prophets; it makes its prediction and then disappears.”

 Bill Vaughn (1947-   )


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair, turning milder (1,2,3,4,5,6-7); rain showers, then flurries, turning breezy and colder (8,9,10,11). Dry, chilly at first (12,13,14,15) with flurries, then windy and colder (16); chilly and windy at first, with a light snow, wintry mix 17,18,19,20,21,22). Fair, turning milder (23.24.25) remaining fair and seasonable (26,27,28). 

 

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: High winds (16). 

 

FULL MOON: February’s FULL MOON will occur on the 16th in 2022. Where tribes saw the deepest snow, it was called SNOW MOON while other tribes called it WOLF MOON because of all of the howling heard during the month, which happens to be the middle of their breeding season! And because there is such an extreme scarcity of game to hunt everywhere during this month, it was also aptly referred to as HUNGER MOON

 

SPECIAL NOTES: Look out for “Punxsutawney Phil” to make his annual and much-anticipated appearance on Wednesday, February 2nd to issue his ‘prediction’ of the coming of Spring! How this little marmota monax reacts to the day’s weather will determine the arrival of Spring. If is sunny and he sees his shadow, he will retreat underground for another 6 weeks of Winter! If it is cloudy and he doesn’t get scared by his own shadow, Spring will come early in 2022. 

 

HOLIDAYS: The Christian Festival of Lights, or Candlemas, will be celebrated on Wednesday, February 2nd. As part of a long tradition, many churches would display many more candles on this day during their daily services. Not only did it make the service a special one , but it was also believed that the additional light would provide protection from illness and plague in the coming year. Valentine’s Day, February 14th, falls on Monday, in 2022. Show that special someone just how special they are and how much you appreciate that they’re part of your life. The birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (Saturday, February 12th) and George Washington (Tuesday, the 22nd) are collectively celebrated on President’s Day, which falls on Monday, February 21st, providing us with an extended holiday weekend. Enjoy! 

 

THE GARDEN: In the event of snow, be sure to shake or brush off the white stuff from the branches of your evergreens and shrubs. Plants that may have been pushed out of the ground by frost heave should be pressed firmly back into place. Continue feeding our feathered friends. You will want them to stick around so they will provide natural insect control when the weather warms again. 

 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (26,27); Best for weeding and stirring the soil (9,10,11); Best for planting above-ground crops (2,3,4); Best for harvesting all crops (24,25). Best days to set hens and incubators (8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20), slaughter and butcher meat (1,2,3,4,5,6,7); transplant (1,2,3,4,5,6,7); harvest and store grains (23,24,25,26,27,28), wean animals (1,2,3,4,24,25,26,27,28).

 

 J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

 

“Be happy if you can, but do not despise those that are otherwise for you know not their troubles”


FEBRUARY 2022


“May you always have work for your hands to do.
May your pockets hold always a coin or two.
May the sun shine bright on your windowpane.
May the rainbow be certain to follow each rain.
May the hand of a friend always be near you.
And may God fill your heart with gladness to cheer you”   
Old Irish Blessing


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Snow, wind (1,2,3); fair, breezy and colder (4). Dry, turning warmer(5,6,7,8,9) with showers, then windy and colder, with flurries, snow showers in the west (10); dry truing milder (11,12,13,14,1,16,17) with more showers, wet snow in the west, then turning sharply warmer (18,19,20). Again, dry, very mild (21.22.23) with again, more showers, then breezy, colder, with flurries (24); cold early, late day showers (25), turning milder, with scattered rain showers (26,27,28,29); rain, thunderstorms in the east with wet snow and wind in the west (30,31). 

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees Heavy Snow, High Wind (1,2,3) with Severe Thunderstorms in the Mid-Atlantic Region on the 30th. 

 

FULL MOON: March’s FULL MOON for will occur on the 18th. It has been called WORM MOON by many tribes of Native Americans because of the abundance of earthworms beginning to appear because of the softening of frozen soil from the warming temperatures. It has also been called SAP MOON because sap would begin to rise and run during this time of year.
 

SPECIAL NOTES: Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 13th in 2022. Don’t forget to reset all of your clocks and watches when you ‘spring’ ahead an hour at 2AM EST. The Vernal Equinox will occur Sunday, March 20th which is considered the first day of Spring! The Almanack suggests that you “Go fly a kite” during this very windy month. Check out some of these classic designs you can make at home at wwww.my-best-kite.com/how-to-build-kites.html. 

 

HOLIDAYS: Shrove Tuesday falls on March 1st, Ash Wednesday is observed on March 2nd , and the First Sunday in Lent is March 6th. And in honor of St. Patrick on Thursday, March 17th, wear something green and festive! 

 

THE GARDEN: Get started early if the weather allows. Test your soil for pH to see if any amendments are necessary. A general rule of thumb is to add 4 lbs. of lime per 100 sq. ft. of garden for every pH point below 6.5, or 1 lb. of sulfur per 100 sq. ft. for every pH point above 7.5. It’s time to start tomatoes, lettuce, and many other vegetable seeds indoors. And do try to plant your peas on St. Patrick’s Day! 

 

THE FARM: Best days for planting root crops (18,19,20); weeding and stirring the soil (9,10); planting above-ground crops (11,12,13); harvesting all crops (23,24,27,28); setting hens and incubators (10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25); slaughtering/butchering meat (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9); transplanting (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9); harvesting and storing grain (1,25,26,27,28,29,30,31); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (1,2,3,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30). 

 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

 

“It is often true that the more one learns, the more one realizes how little one knows”



MARCH 2022

"Here cometh April again, and as far as I can see the world hath more fools in it than ever."          Charles Lamb (1835-1910)

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Cooler, dry (1,2,3); occasional rain; wet snow, wintery mix west and turning windy (4,5,6). Dry and cold (7,8),with showers (9) turning dry, warmer (10,11,12,13,14,15); breezy, turning cooler with occasional rain showers (16,17,18); morning freeze, dry (19), again, dry and turning warmer (20,21,22). Dry and mild, then showers (23,24,25,26) with yet more showers and THUNDERSTORMS, turning windy and colder (27,28,29,30).

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack forecast a wintery mix (4,5,6) and warns of a possible hard freeze (19) and severe THUNDERSTORMS (28,29,30).

FULL MOON: April’s FULL MOON will occur on Monday, April 16th. It has been called PINK MOON because of the many pretty flowers blooming during the month. And because fishing typically improves, due to the warming weather, it has also been called to as FISH MOON,

SPECIAL NOTES: April Fool’s Day falls on Friday, April 1st in 2021. Beware of practical jokes and pranks that may be coming your way from family, co-workers, and friends! Tax Day is Friday, April 15th.  Request an extension immediately using the form found at www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4868.pdf if you are not ready to file. Earth Day is observed on Friday, April 22nd. The Earth Day Network, at (202)518-0044, and at www.earthday.net can provide some interesting, fun, and easy activities that you and your family can do that will help promote a healthier relationship with our dear and fragile Mother Earth! Arbor Day falls on Saturday, April 30th. Go to www.arborday.org/ for more on The Arbor Day Foundation’s mission, which focuses on helping others understand and use trees as a solution to the many global issues we face today that include air quality, water quality, a rapidly changing climate, deforestation, poverty, and hunger..

HOLIDAYS: Ramadan begins on April 2nd at sundown. Easter Sunday falls on Sunday April 17th in 2022. Celebrate the resurrection of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, by attending the church of your choice.

THE GARDEN: Set out annuals and other perennials now. Cool season vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, peas, broccoli, cauliflower, and beets can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked. A good test of “soil readiness” is to take a handful of soil and squeeze it. If it remains in a ball, it’s too moist and should be allowed to dry further. If it crumbles, start planting! Begin planting indoor seedlings outdoors.  Harden them off first with several short days outside under cover.  Fertilize winter planted vegetables early in the month and after any danger of frost, begin planting warm season vegetables.

THE FARM Best days for planting root crops (30); weeding and stirring the soil (5,6,7); planting above-ground crops (8,9); planting root crops (7,8,9); harvesting all crops (19,20,23,24); to set hens and incubators (9,10,11,12,13,4,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23); slaughter and butcher meat (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,30); transplanting (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,30); harvesting and storing of grain (23,24,25,26,27,28,29); weaning of animals and livestock (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19).

JOHN GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“The wise man often says little while observing much, while the fool observes little while talking a lot”



APRIL 2022

“Motherhood: All love begins and ends there”

Robert Browning (1812—1889)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Warm, scattered showers north and isolated thunderstorms, south 1,2,3,4,5); showers and isolated thunderstorms, then turning cooler (6,7; fair, turning hot 8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16); heavy rain, thunderstorms (17,18); dry, chilly, light frost west, then warmer (19,20,21), turning hot with isolated showers and thunderstorms (23,24,25); showers and thunderstorms (26,27,28,29,30,31).

 EXTREME WEATHER WATCH: Severe thunderstorm (5); more severe thunderstorms with heavy rain (17,18); still more severe thunderstorms, heavy rain ( 26,27,28,29,30,31)

FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in May occurs on Sunday, May 15th. Many Native American tribes called it FLOWER MOON because of the many flowers that start to emerge and blossom during this month, While the Huron tribes specifically chose to call it BUDDING MOON for the very same reasons!  The colonial farmer called it MILK MOON because of the noticeable increase in milk produced by his dairy cows.

SPECIAL NOTES: The first day of Shawwai begins at sunset on May 2nd. National Day of Prayer, Thursday, May 5th, was established in 1952 at the direct suggestion of Reverend Billy Graham (1918–2018). It was signed into law under Ronald Reagan in 1988.

HOLIDAYS: Cinco de Mayo is celebrated on Thursday, May 5th. Mothers are honored on Mother’s Day, Sunday May 8th. That “very special lady” deserves a nice dinner out, a sentimental card and/or nice flower arrangement, or just a telephone call to say, “I love you”! Rogation Sunday falls on May 22nd, and Ascension Day follows on Thursday, May 26th. Memorial Day falls on Monday, May 3oth in 2022. On this day we honor those who have died protecting our freedoms and to all those who are currently serving today. Their unflinching service and sacrifice have protected our way of life. We should also extend that recognition to include doctors, all health care workers, and all who are deemed essential in this troubled time.

THE GARDEN: Carrots, lettuce, potatoes, corn, beans, peas and most popular vegetables, with the exception of the warmer weather crops, can be seeded or planted into the vegetable garden at any time now.   Wait until mid to late May before planting the warmer weather crops like Tomatoes, Squash, cucumber, pumpkins and peppers. Now is a good time start repairing your lawn. Fill in the bare spots by slightly loosening surface of the soil and sow a good quality lawn seed over the area evenly. Tamp the seed in gently and water. Keep the patch moist by covering with light mulch of lawn clippings. This is the time to eliminate lawn weeds by hand pulling, or the application of a 'weed and feed' fertilizer.... before they go to seed! Setting your mower for a higher cut during the spring months will help the grass to grow in fuller and help choke out the weeds

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (27,28,29); weeding and stirring the soil (2,3,4,30,31); planting above-ground crops (5,6); harvesting all crops (16,17,18); best days for setting hens and incubators (9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,18,20,21,22,23); slaughtering and butchering meat (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,30,31); harvest and store grains (22,23,24,2t5,26,27,28,29); transplanting (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,30,31); weaning of small animals and livestock (17,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24).

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING:

Never let a day go by that you don’t give more to your fellow man and to your community than you receive.



MAY 2022

“I wonder what it would be like to live  in a world
where it was always June.”

L. M. Montgomery (1929—2003)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Warm, scattered showers and thunderstorms (1,2,3); cooler, dry 4,5,6); turning warmer and humid with isolated showers and thunderstorms (7,8,9); cooler, then warm and humid but dry (10,11,12,13); thunderstorms (14); dry north, showers and thunderstorms at first south, turning very hot and humid (15,16,17,18,19); scattered thunderstorms, very hot and humid (20,21,22,23,24,25); occasional afternoon thunderstorms with heavy rain (26,27,28,29,30). 

SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees severe thunderstorms (3); severe thunderstorms, heavy rain (14,15,16); more heavy rain (17); excessive heat (18,19); severe thunderstorms (25,26,27). 

FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in June will occur on Tuesday, June 14th. It has been known as ROSE MOON because roses start to show their gorgeous blooms at the beginning of the month. It has also been referred to as STRAWBERRY MOON because the first strawberries of the season become ripe for the picking in June! 

SPECIAL NOTES: The Summer Solstice that will occur on Saturday, 20th, signals the officially start of summer (it’s finally here!). It’s graduation time so honor your high school or college grad. This is a major milestone and is should be recognized as such with a party or a very special gift. Consider marking the special year (or any special event) with a copy of this year’s Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack. Go to www.almanack.com/order and order one right now! 

HOLIDAYS: Proudly display ‘Old Glory’ on Tuesday, June 14th! Be sure to display it properly and reference www.ushistory.org/betsy/more/displayonly.htm to be sure. Father’s Day is Sunday, June 19th. Do something really nice for the guy who a) taught you how to ride a two-wheeler b) videotaped every sporting event or recital you ever were in, c) helped you finance that new (fill in the blank), or d) all of the above!

THE GARDEN: Plant or sow summer annuals such as nasturtiums, vinca, verbena, geraniums, phlox, marigolds, lobelia, impatiens, cosmos, sunflowers, zinnias, and alyssum. Feed annuals and remove spent flowers to promote another round of flowers. It’s not too late to start warm-season crops such as corn, beans, tomatoes, squash, peppers, and eggplant. If you cut flowers for fresh in-door arrangements early in the morning, they will stay fresher and more vibrant much longer.

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (23,24,25); weeding and stirring the soil (4,5,26,27); planting above-ground crops (1,2,3); harvesting all crops (13,14); the best days for setting hens and incubators (7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (1,2,3,4,5,6,28,29,30); transplanting (1,2,3,4,5,6 28,29,30); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20); the harvesting and storing grains (20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27).

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“A wise man will often rely less on his own judgment to pay respect to judgement of others.”



JUNE 2022

“The United States is the only country with a known birthday”

James G. Blaine (1830-1893)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Isolated late-day thunderstorms, hot and humid (1,2,3); scattered late-day thunderstorms, quite humid (4,5,6,7). Isolated late-day thunderstorms, very hot (8,9,10,11,12); late-day showers and thunderstorms, then slightly cooler but still humid (13,14); dry, turning very hot (15,16,17,18,19); widespread late-day thunderstorms (20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27); scattered thunderstorms, heavy rain (28,29); 30-31 dry, warm and Humid (30,31).  


SEVERE WEATHER WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees severe thunderstorms, heavy rain (14); excessive heat (17,18,19); severe thunderstorms, heavy rain (20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28). 


FULL MOON: July’s Full Moon will occur on Wednesday, July 13th. It has been often referred to by many Native American tribes as THUNDER MOON because of the numerous thunderstorms during the month (see this month’s forecast above!), many quite severe in some areas. However, other tribes in other regions of The United States, called it BUCK MOON due the rapid growth of antlers on young bucks during the month, RIPE CORN MOON because of the appearance of young corn on the stalks, or HAY MOON since hay tended to ripen as well.   


SPECIAL NOTES: Watch out! Those Dog Days of Summer will be upon us starting Sunday, July 3rd. Get ready for some hot, hazy, and humid weather (the dreaded 3 H’s) that will continue into mid-August. 


HOLIDAYS: This year’s Fourth of July celebration falls on Monday, July 4th! On this most famous day in United States History, in 1776, the Continental Congress passed a resolution saying, “these United Colonies are, and of right, ought to be, free and independent states”. Hopefully, you have already ‘tried out’ the old grill this season. Nobody wants any surprises so it was wise to have made sure that it is functioning properly and you remembered to fill up the propane tank (or picked up plenty of charcoal and charcoal lighter fluid!). Now it’s time to enjoy! If planning extended outdoor, use the appropriate level of sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher) and apply frequently, especially if swimming or perspiring.


THE GARDEN: Leggy annuals may need to be pruned back to encourage new growth and more flowering. Be sure that all tall annuals and perennials are securely staked so that they will remain upright during the afternoon thunderstorms that are so common for this time of year. During the dry summer months, remember to mow the lawn when it is high and mow less often. Taller grass withstands drought better because its blades shade the soil. Allow roses to rest in July and August. Do not fertilize, but continue spraying, and give them a light pruning in July to encourage new fall growth.


THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (21,22); weeding and stirring the soil (1,2,3,28,29); planting above-ground crops (8,9); harvesting all crops (10,11,14,15); the best days for setting hens and incubators (7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (1,2,3,4,5,28,29,30,31);transplanting (1,2,3,4,5,28,29,30,31);the weaning of all small animals and livestock (10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17); harvesting and storing grains (20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27).


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“Do not regard liberty and freedom so lightly that you forget its value and take it for granted.” 



JULY 2022

“August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new
         Fall not yet born.  The odd uneven time.

Sylvia  Plath (1932-1963)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Dry, warm and humid (1,2,3,4); late-day showers (5); warm, turning very humid (6,7,8,9,10); humid, late-day THUNDRSTORMS (11,12); fair, not as humid (13); fair but very hot and humid (14,15,16,17,18,19); hot, late-day thunderstorms (20,21,22,23); warm, late-day scattered THUNDERSTORMS (24,25,26); occasional afternoon showers (27); mild, dry (28,29,30,31).

 

SEVERE WATCH: Severe THUNDERSTORMS, heavy rain (12); Severe THUNDERSTORMS, heavy rain (22,23).

 

FULL MOON: August’s full moon will occur on August 11th which just so happens to be the end of the ‘Dog Days of Summer’! Appropriately so, it has been referred to as DOG MOON by many while other Native American tribes called it RIPE MOON or FRUIT MOON due to the many fruits and vegetables that ripen during this month.

 

SPECIAL NOTES: The Gruber Almanack, LLC proudly announces the release of the 227th edition of J. Gruber’s Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack! The Almanack should now be available at newsstands and at popular retailers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region, a month earlier then past years! For a full listing of retailers and their locations, go to www.almanack.com/where-to-buy but why wait? Order The Almanack today at www.almanack.com/order and have it delivered right to your front door! And consider taking advantage of our popular 3-year subscription, which offers guaranteed delivery of The Almanack for the next three years with no increase in price for only $23.50! Or you can register as a Friend of The Almanack (FOTA) and receive a printed copy of the current edition, get immediate access to the digital version of The Almanack (and to next year’s digital edition, too!), access to past digital editions, the monthly newsletter, all for the low price of only $15. All great deal for a great almanac!

 

HOLIDAYS The end of summer is near and Labor Day is a just few weeks. Many are starting school, some for the very first time, and may need special attention. Begin planning now and make a list of the things that need to be done and when they need to be completed. Schedule immunizations and/or physicals, purchase new clothes, and assess school supplies that will be needed with ample lead time to ensure a successful ‘first day’ for your young students.

 

THE GARDEN: August is not too late to sow Portulaca (moss rose). They will bloom in about three weeks from seed. To encourage more flowers, azaleas should be trimmed after they bloom in the spring and before the end of August. Stop feeding trees and shrubs after mid-August. You don’t want to promote new growth that will not have time to fully mature before winter sets in.

 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (17,18,19); weeding and stirring the soil (7,8,9); planting above-ground crops (4,5,6); harvesting all crops (7,8,11,12); the best days for setting hens and incubators (5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (1,2,3,4,27,28,29,30,31); transplanting (1,2,3,4,27,28,29,30,31); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14); harvesting and storing grains (18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26).

 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING: “Keeping one’s eyes, ears, and mind open but mouth closed will often lead to a more thorough understanding of life’s problems”

For more HAGERSTOWN ALMANACK NEWS, click here



AUGUST 2022