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Monthly Almanack

provided courtesy of

Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack!



 

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Previous Month’s Almanacks

"The phrase ’working mother’ is redundant.”

Jane Sellman (1955-    )


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Periods of showers, heavy rain in the southern part of the region (1,2,3,4,5,6); fair and cool (7,8,9) with more showers, STORMS (10,11).  Fair and warm (12,13,14,15) with heavy rains, STORMS in the south again (16,17). Fair and warm again (18,19,20,21) with periods of showers, STORMS (22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29)ending the month with fair and mild temperatures (30,31). 


TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of May. 


FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in May occurs on Thursday, May 7th and has been called FLOWER MOON by many Native Americans because of the many flowers that start to emerge and blossom during this month.  The , however, Huron tribes chose to call it BUDDING MOON for the same reasons. Farmers came to refer to it as MILK MOON because of the noticeable increase in milk produced by dairy cows as the weather starts to warm up. 


SPECIAL NOTES: Cinco de Mayo is celebrated on Tuesday, May 5th. Rogation Sunday falls on May 17th, Ascension Thursday follows on May 21st, and World No Tobacco Day is observed on Sunday, 1 May 31st. When looking for a notable historical event that happened to occur during the month of May, it was noticed that the soap operas, Another World and As The World Turns, both aired for the first time on May 4, 1964. Charles W. Fisher, editor of The Almanack from 1973 to 2000, produced both of those shows during over his 28-year career television broadcasting!

 

HOLIDAYS: Mothers are honored on Mother’s Day, Sunday May 10th. Let Mom know that she’s special with a telephone call, a sentimental card, a nice flower arrangement, or just by spending some quality time with her on her day. Celebrate Armed Forces Day on Tuesday, May 19th and Memorial Day falls on Monday, May 25th.  Those day has been set aside for honoring those who have served in our military and those who are currently serving. Their service and sacrifice have protected our precious freedoms and have ensured that our way of life will continue.  We can extend that recognition to include doctors, all healthcare workers, and everyone deemed essential in this troubled time. 


THE GARDEN: Once your last frost data has passed, warm season crops can be planted. When the ground temperatures reach 70 degrees Fahrenheit, it is safe to begin planting Okra, Pumpkin, Sweet Potatoes, Eggplant, Peppers, Peanuts, Watermelon, Cow Peas, Black-eyed Peas, Crowder Peas, Butter Peas and Butter Beans. Trim up hedges and shrubs to shape and tighten them with new growth. Most flowering shrubs will respond to a light trimming at this time of year. Don’t trim away too many of the emerging buds or you won’t have as many flowers. 


THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (20,21,22); weeding and stirring the soil (23,24, 27,28);  planting above-ground crops (25,26); harvesting all crops (8,9); best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,30,32); slaughtering and butchering meat (22,23,24,25,26,27,28); transplanting (22,23,24,25,26,27,28); the weaning of small animals and livestock (8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17); harvest and store grains (8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17). 


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING:


"Perseverance often provides more rewards than that lucky break we’re always hoping for”.



MAY 2020

“When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant
 I could not stand to have the old man around.
 But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished
 how much he had learned in 7 years”

Mark Twain (1836-1875)



MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Periods of showers, heavy rain, late (1,2,3,4,5,6)turning fair and warm (7,8,9,10). STORMS (11,12) turning fair and warm again (13,14,15,16,17,18,19). More STORMS (20,21) turning once again, fair and warm (22,23); periods of STORMS, heavy rain, late (24,25,26,27,2,8,29,30.

 

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees possible tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region from the 26th to the 29th of June.

 

FULL MOON: June’s FULL MOON will occur on Friday, June 5th. Monday, June 17th. It has been called STRAWBERRY MOON because the first strawberries of the season become ripe for the picking (and for the eating!) during this month. And because roses start to show their gorgeous blooms at the beginning of the month, it has also been called ROSE MOON.

 

SPECIAL NOTES: Summer officially starts with the Summer Solstice that occurs on Saturday, 20th but with an unprecedented health crisis dictating that we maintain social distancing and wear face masks, it will be different summer this year. With many graduations cancelled due the Covid-19 pandemic, we must do what we can to honor our favorite students when he or she graduates from high school or college. This is a major milestone and cannot pass without the recognition that it is due. Mark the achievement with a special event or memorable gift (like a copy of this year’s Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack to mark the occasion!).

 

HOLIDAYS: On Sunday, June 14th, proudly display ‘Old Glory’! Be sure to do it properly and check the various ways how to do so at www.ushistory.org/betsy/more/displayonly.htm. Father’s Day is Sunday, June 21st . Do something really nice for the guy who a) taught you how to ride a two-wheeler b) videotaped every sporting event or recital you were in, c) helped you finance that new (fill in the blank), or d) All of the above!

THE GARDEN: It’s not too late to start warm-season crops such as corn, beans, tomatoes, squash, peppers, and eggplant. Plant or sow summer annuals such as nasturtiums, vinca, verbena, geraniums, phlox, marigolds, lobelia, impatiens, cosmos, sunflowers, zinnias, and alyssum. Feed annuals and remove spent flowers to promote another round of flowers. Feed roses after each bloom cycle, water regularly, and remove any spent flowers. Additional pruning may be required in June of fast-growing plants, such as juniper, privet and yew. This will help promote new growth and also maintain a desirable shape during the growing season.

 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (16,17,18); weeding and stirring the soil (19,20); planting above-ground crops (21,22); harvesting all crops (5,6); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (21,22,23,24,25,26,27); transplanting (21,22,23,24,25,26,27); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13); harvesting and storing grains (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20).

JOHN GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“Every person has two educations-one from others, and one more important which he gives himself”



JUNE 2020


Back to Top

"I realize that patriotism is not enough. I must have no hatred or bitterness towards anyone”

Edith Cavell (1865-1915)

 

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair and warm (1,2,3,4,5)with STORMS 6,7,8); fair and very warm (9,10,11,12)with periods of STORMS (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22). Hazy, hot and humid (23,24,25,26) with Atlantic hurricane, heavy rain (27,28,29) turning hazy, hot, and humid again (30,31).  

 

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region in the month of July.  

 

FULL MOON: July’s Full Moon will occur on July 4th. Native Americans called it THUNDER MOON due to the high number of thunderstorms during the month, some quite severe in many areas, that occur during the month. It has also been called BUCK MOON given the rapid growth of antlers on young bucks in July and HAY MOON and RIPE CORN MOON since both hay tends to ripen and because of the appearance of young corn on the stalks. 

 

SPECIAL NOTES: The ‘Dog Days of Summer’ begin on Friday, July 3rd and will continue into mid-August. 

 

HOLIDAYS: Independence Day falls on Saturday, July 4th in 2020. Celebrate safely and enjoy the holiday while remaining cautious during this pandemic. If spending time outdoors, use plenty of sunscreen, applying it frequently to yourself and the kids, especially if swimming or engaging in strenuous activities like sports or hiking.  

 

THE GARDEN: Be sure that all tall annuals and perennials are securely staked so that they will remain upright during the afternoon thunderstorms that are so common for this time of year. During the dry summer months, remember to mow the lawn when it is high and mow less often. Taller grass withstands drought better because its blades shade the soil. Allow roses to rest in July and August. Do not fertilize, but continue spraying, and give them a light pruning in July to encourage new fall growth. Repot houseplants that have been kept outdoors if roots start to crowd their containers. If you have to divide plants, give them a chance to recover from the disruption to their root system by keeping them in the shade for at least a week. 

 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (14,15); weeding and stirring the soil (21,22); planting above-ground crops (1,27,28); harvesting all crops (2,3,6,7,8); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13, 27,28,29,30,31); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (20,21,22,23,24,25,26); transplanting (20,21,22,23,24,25,26); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,29,30,31); harvesting and storing grains (12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19). 

 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

 

“Do not regard liberty and freedom so lightly that you forget its value and take it for granted.”




JULY 2020

“What dreadful hot weather we have! 
It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance”

                                             Jane Austen (1775-1817)  

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Hazy, hot, and humid (1,2,3) with brief periods of STORMS (4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12). Remnants of Golf hurricane, heavy rain (13,14,15) turning hot and humid (16,17,18); periods of STORMS, heavy rain in the southern part of the region 19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26)ending the month with fair but hot temperatures (27,28,29,30,31).   

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in August. 

FULL MOON: August’s full moon will occur on August 3rd. Because of the many fruits and vegetables that ripen during the month, many Native American tribes called it FRUIT MOON or referred to as RIPE MOON. And since August 11th marks the end of the ‘Dog Days of Summer’, it has also been called DOG MOON as well. 

SPECIAL NOTES: The 225th edition of J. Gruber’s Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack will be on newsstands and at popular retailers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region in September but you will be able to order the 2021 issue of The Almanack online very soon! Watch for the coming announcement when The Almanack can be ordered online, order your copy, and have it delivered to your front door soon after Labor Day! Check out www.almanack.com/order and consider taking advantage of our popular 3-year subscription, which offers guaranteed delivery of The Almanack for the next three years with no increase in price for only $23.50! Or you can register as a Friend of the Almanack (FOTA) and receive a hard copy of the current edition, have immediate access to the digital version of The Almanack (and to next year’s digital edition, too!), access to past digital editions, the monthly newsletter, all for the low price of only $15. All great deal for a great almanac! 

HOLIDAYS: Where did the Summer go? Labor Day is right around the corner so enjoy the summer while it lasts! If planning outdoor activities such as going to the beach, boating, or in your own backyard, barbequing on the grill, be sure to include plenty of water and sun screen! 

THE GARDEN: August is not too late to sow Portulaca (moss rose). They will bloom in about three weeks from seed. If you choose to water your lawn, do so only when wilted or discolored. Think about potting herbs you plan to move indoors for the winter. Don’t move them in just yet but get them accustomed to their containers early. Rosemary, thyme, and tarragon are the best candidates for this. To encourage more flowers, azaleas should be trimmed after they bloom in the spring and before the end of August. Stop feeding trees and shrubs after mid-August. You don’t want to promote new growth that will not have time to fully mature before winter sets in. 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (10,11,12); weeding and stirring the soil (17,18); planting above-ground crops (23,24,25); harvesting all crops (3,4); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,26,27,28,29,30,31); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (1,2,3,4,5,6,30,31); transplanting (18,18,20,21,22,23,24); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,26,27,28,29,30,31); harvesting and storing grains (11,12,13,14,5,16,17). 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

“Congratulating oneself is not the best evidence of success”



AUGUST 2020

"Happy we who can bask in this warm September sun, which illumines
   all creatures, as well when they rest as when they toil, not without 
    a feeling of gratitude; whose life is as blameless, how blameworthy
 soever it may be, on the Lord’s Mona-day as on his Suna-day."
                                                         Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

 
MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: STORMS, cooler (1,2) turning fair and warm (3,4,5); periods of STORMS (6,7,8,9,10,11,12) again, turning fair and quite warmer (13,14,15,16) with periods of STORMS (17,18,19,20,21,22,23). Fair and cooler (24,25) with yet more STORMS (26,27) turning fir and mild (28,29,30)

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the month of September.

FULL MOON: September’s Full Moon has been famously-known as the HARVEST MOON. It is the Full Moon that falls closest to the Autumnal Equinox. During this time, the moon would rise soon after the sun would set on several successive days, giving the farmer a few extra hours of ‘light’ and more time to finish up their daily chores. This year, the Autumnal Equinox will occur on Tuesday, September 22nd and signals the beginning of Autumn. The Full Moon closest to that date will occur on Thursday, October 1st and is therefore, the HARVEST MOON of 2020.  

SPECIAL NOTES: The 2021 Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack will be on newsstands and at popular retailers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region the week of September 7th! A complete list of retail locations, go to www.almanack.com/where-to-buy-us but you can save some time by going to www.almanack.com/order, ordering your copy today, and have it delivered right to your front door! Consider taking advantage of our very popular 3-year subscription. It guarantees no price increase and will deliver The Almanack with no charge for shipping for the next 3 years. Or become a Friend of The Almanack (FOTA), get immediate access to our new on-line digital version as well as THE NEXT EDITION, receive a hardcopy of the current edition, access to past digital editions, and so much more! Great deals for a great almanac!


HOLIDAYS: Labor Day falls on the first Monday of the month which is September 7th in 2020. We must always remember those who lost their lives on September 11th, 2001 and to also honor all of the brave first-responders as well. These heroes ran into danger, some sacrificing their lives trying to minimize the loss of life and those who suffer to this day with long-term life-threatening health effects. Citizenship Day is observed on Thursday, September 17th and Rosh Hashanah begins on Friday, September 18th at sunset.    


THE GARDEN: Make a long-range plan to gradually convert your current landscape to the one you desire. Don’t forget to consider what your flower garden might need. Plant spring-flowering bulbs such as daffodils, hyacinths, and tulips 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost. Don't pull out any ornamental plantings until you have the time and resources to replace them. Start taking cuttings of your annual plants to bring indoors and carry through the winter. Geranium, coleus, fuschia, and other plants do best when stem cuttings are rooted and kept in pots indoors through the winter. Be sure to place pots where they receive plenty of light. Bring summer vacationing houseplants back indoors while the windows are still open. Inspect every plant very closely for any hitchhiking pests! Don't allow leaves to accumulate on the lawn. Rake them up regularly, and store in a pile for use as mulch in your garden next summer. If leaves accumulate on your lawn and become matted down by rain, they may kill the grass.


THE FARM: Best days for planting root crops (6,7,8); weeding and stirring the soil (14,15); planting above-ground crops (20,21); harvesting all crops (4,5); best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 24,25,26,27,28,29,30); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (17,18,19,20,21,22); transplanting (17,18,19,20,21,22); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (1,2,3,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30); the harvesting and storing of grains (10,11,12,13,14,15,16).


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING:  “If you are going to do a good thing, do it now; if you are going to do a mean thing, wait until tomorrow”



SEPTEMBER 2020

"Listen! the wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves,

 we have had our summer evenings, now for October eves!”                                                                           Humbert Wolfe (1885-1940)



MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Occasional showers, breezy (1,2,3) turning cooler and windy (4,5); warm and dry (6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14) with heavy rain, STORMS, and wind (15,16,17,18). Cooler, brisk, frost/freeze west (19,20) turning warm and dry (21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29; heavy rain, STORMS, wind (30,31).

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity for the Mid-Atlantic Region in the month of October. 


FULL MOON: October has two FULL MOON to occur during the month. The first, occurring on Thursday, October 1st was recognized last month as the HARVEST MOON of 2020 (the full moon falling closest to the Autumnal Equinox). The second to occur is the HUNTER’S MOON of 2020. Named because of the extra light it provided many Native Americans to extend their hunt for food into the early evening, it will occur on Saturday, October 31st. It was also referred to as MOON OF FALLING LEAVES and YELLOW LEAF MOON by the Cree Tribe because many of the trees lose the last of their leaves during the month and because of the many leaves turning that color during October.  


HOLIDAYS: Columbus Day is observed on Monday, October 12th, United Nations Day is celebrated on Saturday, the 24th, and Halloween falls on Saturday, October 31st.  


SPECIAL NOTES: Remember…..get your flu shots early this year! And follow current guidelines for protecting yourself, your family and loved ones as well as others we may encounter throughout our day. October is Fire Prevention Month. In 1922, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) named the second week of October Fire Prevention Week in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. Today, we celebrate Fire Prevention Week and Month by raising fire safety awareness and educating families, students and communities across the United States. During this month, fire departments provide education to their communities, and encourage parents and loved ones to practice fire safety and whole home safety. Have an evacuation plan ready with your family and check smoke detector batteries often.  


THE GARDEN: There is still time left to plant perennial seeds and bulbs! With a little effort at Fall planting time, you will speed the timing of that first new growth by as much as a month. During the fall months, after soil temperature drops below 60°F., the bulbs of spring flowering Tulips, Daffodils, Hyacinths, Siberian Squill, Dwarf Irises, Anemone, and Crocus should be planted. Most spring flowering bulbs should be in the ground by the early part of this month, with the exception of Tulips which can be planted up until early November. Select healthy, disease free bulbs. Add bone meal or bulb fertilizer into the planting hole, as you prepare the soil. One last effort at weeding will help to improve the appearance of your garden throughout the winter. Any weed that you can eliminate from the garden this fall will possibly prevent thousands of weed seeds from sprouting in the garden next spring!  


THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (4,5,15,16); weeding and stirring the soil (11,12); planting above-ground crops (17,18); harvesting all crops (1,2,3); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (16,17,18,19,20,21,22); transplanting (16,17,18,19,20,21,22); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27); harvesting and storing grains (9,10,11,12,13,14,15).   


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING  


“Be fair in the criticism of others, but more so in that of yourself.”

OCTOBER 2020

"The thankful receiver bears a plentiful harvest."

William Blake (1787-1827) 

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Showers, breezy, cool, frost/freeze in central region (1). Warmer an dry (2,3,4,5,6,7) with periods of rain (8,9,10,11); dry and mild (12,13)with more rain and wet snow, turning colder, frost/freeze in the east (14,15,16). Sunny and chilly (17,18,19,20,21), turning dry and milder (22,23,24,25,26,27,28). Rain, windy with snow showers in the west (29,30).

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of November.

FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in November will occur on Monday, November 30th. Due to the colder days and heavy frosts during the month, all of the leaves have fallen and most of the grasses have all died off and thus, has been referred to as FALLING LEAF MOON and DYING GRASS MOON.  And because of the high winds sweeping through many regions this time of year, it was called BIG WIND MOON. 

SPECIAL NOTES: Daylight Savings ends for 2020 on Sunday, November 1st so be sure to “fall back’ an hour at 2AM And be sure to check out Almanack Weather Prognosticator, Chad Merrill’s article in the 2021 edition of The Almanack, where he presents the case of whether to continue the practice, offering the pro and cons of this annual 

HOLIDAYS: The 2020 elections will be held on Tuesday, November 3rd and this year, it will be for The President of The United States. Now more than ever, your vote is needed to help determine the course of America for the next 4 years. If voting by mail, complete your ballot immediately upon receipt and place the properly-completed ballot into a legitimate drop box in your area or mail as early as possible. Wednesday, November 11th is Veteran’s Day. Remember to honor our military service branches and those have served and with their service, continue to protect us today. Thanksgiving is celebrated on Thursday, November 26th. Join with family and friends in reflecting on of things we have t be thankful for and try to carry that throughout the holiday season. And though not officially recognized as a holiday, Saturday, November 10th is the great civil rights leader, Martin Luther King’s actual birthday. 

THE GARDEN: Even though lawns rest in winter, they still need all the winter sunlight they can get so don’t put away the rake until all of the leaves and pine needles have fallen and you can remove them. Keep mowing if your lawn is still growing. If you do have to do that one last mow, don’t bag those grass clippings. Instead, recycle them back onto the lawn. Contrary to what you might have heard, clippings will not become thatch (a spongy layer found between grass blades and roots). Keep watering until the ground temperature reaches 40 degrees F. Now is the time to start those forced bulbs that were placed in a cool area in August or September. 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (1,12,13); weeding and stirring the soil (7,8,9); planting above-ground crops (22,23,24); harvesting all crops (25,26); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30; the slaughtering and butchering of meat (15,16,17,18,19,20; transplanting (15,16,17,18,19,20); the weaning of small animals and livestock (16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24)); the harvesting and storing grains (19,20,21,22,23,24,25). 

JOHN GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“There is more to be learned by listening closely and keeping an open mind, even though you often may not agree with the speaker.”



NOVEMBER 2020

”I heard the bells of Christmas Day; old familiar carols play, and wild and sweet the word repeat of peace on earth, good will to men!”…..Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1802-1882)



 MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Breezy, turning milder (1,2,3,4); showers turning breezy again (5,6). Fair, colder (7,8,9) with more showers, wet snow, west (10,11,12); colder windy (13,14,15) turning fair and milder(16,17,18,19,20). More rain and wet snow, west (21,22,23) turning fair and windy, at first (24,25); yet more rain, ice, and wet snow, west (26,27,28) ; fair and colder (29,30,31).    

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of December.

FULL MOON: The FULL MOON for December occurs on Tuesday, December 29th. Many Native Americans referred to December’s FULL MOON as COLD MOON (for obvious reasons!). Other tribes called it ICE-FORMING MOON and BEAVER MOON because lakes and ponds begin to ice over and in many areas, beavers are scurrying to finish building their dams and lodges before the winter sets in for good.

SPECIAL NOTES: Winter Solstice will occur on Monday, December 21st. The Hagerstown Town & Country Almanack wishes everyone the happiest of holidays and again, pledges to its loyal readers (and followers on social media!) to continue to inform, inspire, and entertain as it has done for 225 years! Remember that The Almanack makes a great gift that keeps giving throughout the year! Go to www.almanack.com/order, order a holiday copy or two (or three or four!), and this year, consider including a nifty THE ALMANACK KNOWS WHICH WAY THE WIND BLOWS! sweatshirt or tee under the tree. Go to www.bonfire.com/the-almanack-knows, check out the styles and colors, and order one today.

HOLIDAYS: Hanukah begins at sunset on Friday, December 11th, Christmas is celebrated on Friday, December 25th, and Kwanzaa begins on Saturday, December 26th. Enjoy family and friends during these festive times and keep that joyful and giving spirit alive throughout the coming year. New Year’s Eve falls on Thursday, December 31st. Make plans to attend a First Night Celebration and enjoy a safe, family-oriented evening of fun, food, and entertainment on the very first night of the year. Look online at www.firstnight.com/cities to find a celebration nearest you.

THE GARDEN: Consider a garden shop gift card or garden tool for the gardener in your life. Books on their favorite type of plants or a gift card to a popular gardening catalog are welcome gifts (and so would The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack!). Turn your gardening attentions to those houseplants (and other plants you have moved inside for the winter). Remember that warmer indoor temperatures can quickly dry out most plants and they will need a bit more than usual.

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (9,10); weeding and stirring the soil (5,6); planting above-ground crops (2,3,4); harvesting all crops (22,23); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (14,15,16,17,18,19,20); transplanting (14,15,16,17,18,19,20); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21); harvesting and storing grains (7,8,9,10,11,12,13).

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING

“The thought that goes into the giving of a gift to a friend or loved one is so much more important than the value of the gift itself”



DECEMBER 2020

“Character is the ability to carry out a good resolution long after the excitement of the moment has passed.”…..Cavett Robert (1907-1997)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Dry, turning mild (1,2,3,4,5) with rain and wintery mix (6,7,8,9,10); windy , colder with snow showers in the western part of the region ((11,12). Fair and milder (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20) with light snow and wintery mix (21,22,23,24,25); windy, milder (26,27,28,29) remaining windy and much colder with snow showers in the west.

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of January.

FULL MOON: The first FULL MOON of 2021 will occur on Thursday, January 28th. It has been called HUNGER MOON by many Native American tribes because of the scarcity of game at this time of year. Other tribes called it WOLF MOON because of the increased boldness of wolf packs venturing closure and closer to their camps looking for food.

SPECIAL NOTES: The 2021 Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack is its 225th edition. It has been continuously published since its first appearance in 1797and while it is the second oldest almanac in the United States, it is the ONLY almanac in America that is still published by heirs of its founder, John Gruber. Both he and his partner and son-in-law, Daniel May, would be proud to see their almanac continuing to provide even more refined weather forecasts and astronomical data vital to agricultural success in the region. It is our commitment to continue improving our look, the accuracy of our weather forecasts, and offering useful information and inspiration to help one survive in today’s world. In that way, The Hagerstown Town & Country Almanack will earn its place in the 21st Century as a useful and cherished reference as it has been in centuries past. 

HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day falls on Friday, January 1st. Martin Luther King, Jr., famed civil rights activist leader, was born on January 15, 1929. His birthday is celebrated on the third Monday of the month. In 2021, that is Monday, January 18th. This great leader must be remembered on this day for the great social changes he brought about in this country and for the ultimate sacrifice he made pursuing unity and racial harmony which still eludes us today. 

THE GARDEN: Be sure to shake or brush off heavy snow from the branches of your evergreens and shrubs. The light fluffy snow poses no real threat, but if it should become wet and frozen, the weight dramatically increases. Branches are more brittle when the plants are dormant, and the weight of the snow may snap them off. Take care of our feathered friends who will need a reliable supply of water and food during winter. Once you start feeding them, they'll keep returning for more, so be prepared to continue providing ample amounts of both until natural water supplies and food becomes available later in the Spring. 

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (5,6); weeding and stirring the soil (1,2,3,4); planting above-ground crops (16,17); harvesting all crops (9,10,11); the best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31); the slaughtering and butchering of meat (13,14,15,16,17,18,19); transplanting (13,14,15,16,17,18,19); the weaning of all small animals and livestock (9,10,11,12,13,14,5,16,17); harvesting and storing grains (6,7,8,9,10,11,12), 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING 

“The next twelve months offer a world of promise; it all depends on each of us and how much we are willing to give of ourselves to help make it a better world”


JANUARY 2021

“The February sunshine steeps your boughs and tints the buds and swells the leaves within”…..William Cullen Bryant (1794-1820)


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Milder and dry (1,2,3) with snow; rain near the coast (4,5,6).  Windy, colder (7,8,9) turning fair and not as cold (10,11); more rain, showers, mild (12,13,14), windy, colder (15,16). Fair and mild (17,18) with snow (19,20), turning fair and mild again (21,22,23,24,25,26.  More snow, windy 927,28).

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region in the month of February.

FULL MOON: In 2021, February’s FULL MOON will occur on the 27th. In many parts of North America, where tribes saw the deepest snow, it was called SNOW MOON and because there was such an extreme scarcity of game to hunt, it was also aptly referred to as HUNGER MOON. It has been also refer to as WOLF MOON because of all of the howling heard during the month, which happens to be the middle of their breeding season! 

SPECIAL NOTES: Watch out!  “Punxsutawney Phil” will make his annual and much-anticipated appearance on Tuesday, February 2nd to issue his ‘prediction’ of the coming of Spring!  How this little marmota monax reacts to the day’s weather will determine the arrival of Spring. If is sunny and he sees his shadow, he will retreat underground for another 6 weeks of Winter! If it is cloudy and he doesn’t get scared by his own shadow, Spring will come early in 2021.

HOLIDAYS: The Christian Festival of Lights, or Candlemas, is celebrated on Tuesday, February 2nd.  Many churches would traditionally display many more candles on this day during their daily services, not only make the service special, but it was also believed that the additional light would provide protection from illness and plague in the coming year. Valentine’s Day, February 14th, falls on Sunday in 2021.  Show that special someone just how much you appreciate they’re being a part of your life. The birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (Friday, February 12th) and George Washington (Monday, the 22nd) are collectively celebrated on President’s Day which falls on Monday, February 17th to provide us with an extended holiday weekend. Enjoy!

THE GARDEN: With some good news from our friend “Punxsutawney Phil”, we can start thinking about things to do in an early. It's time to turn the compost pile (if it’s not too frozen!). Mid- to late-February is the time to fertilize shrubs and evergreens. Use an acid-type Rhododendron fertilizer to feed evergreens, conifers, broad leaf evergreens, Rhododendrons, Azaleas, and Camellias. Use an all-purpose fertilizer to feed Roses and other deciduous trees and shrubs. If you use granular type fertilizers, be sure to water it in thoroughly. For more gardening activities in February, click here.

THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (1,2,3,8,9); Best for weeding and stirring the soil (20,21); Best for planting above-ground crops (12,13,14); Best for harvesting all crops (6,7). Best days to set hens and incubators (1, 2,3,4,5,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28, slaughter and butcher meat (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18); transplant (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18); harvest and store grains (4,5,6,7,8,9,10), wean animals (6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14). 



FEBRUARY 2021

May the Irish hills caress you;  May her lakes and rivers bless you;  May the luck of the Irish enfold you;  May the blessings of St. Patrick behold you…..Old Irish Blessing 

                          

MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Milder and dry (1,2,3) with snow; rain near the coast (4,5,6).  Windy, colder (7,8,9) turning fair and not as cold (10,11); more rain, showers, mild (12,13,14), windy, colder (15,16). Fair and mild (17,18) with snow (19,20), turning fair and mild again (21,22,23,24,25,26.  More snow, windy 927,28).

TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region in the month of March.

FULL MOON: The FULL MOON for March will occur on the 28th. Many tribes of Native Americans referred to it as WORM MOON because of the abundance of earthworms beginning to appear because of the softening of frozen soil from the warming temperatures. It has also been referred to as SAP MOON because sap would begin to rise and run during this time of year.

SPECIAL NOTES: Don’t forget to reset all of your clocks and watches when you ‘spring’ ahead an hour on Sunday, March 14th at 2:00 AM EST when Daylight Saving Time begins. The Vernal Equinox will occur Saturday, March 20th that signals the arrival of Spring! “Go fly a kite” during this windy month. Nothing is as exhilarating except maybe flying itself! Check out some of these classic designs you can make at home at wwww.my-best-kite.com/how-to-build-kites.html. 

HOLIDAYS: Passover begins at sunset on Saturday, March 27th. Palm Day is on March 28th. And don’t forget to wear green in honor of St. Patrick, on Tuesday, March 17th 

THE GARDEN: March is prime time for feeding shrubs and perennials that bloom in the Summer months. Start slow-growing and cool season seeds such as onions, leeks, parsley, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, eggplant and peppers. If you did not do so in February, apply a pre-emergent herbicide (that prevents crabgrass) to established lawns before March 15th.   

THE FARM: Best days for planting root crops (7,8); weeding and stirring the soil (19,20,21); planting above-ground crops (22,23); harvesting all crops (5,6): setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31): slaughtering/butchering meat (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20); transplanting (13,14,15,16,17,18,,,1,9,,20);harvesting and storing grain (5,6,7,8,9,,10,11,12);the weaning of all small animals and livestock (5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13).  

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING  

“There is more to be learned by listening closely, keeping an open mind, even though you often don’t agree with the speaker” 


MARCH 2021

"The first of April is the day we remember what we are the other 364 days of the year”…..Mark Twain (1835-1910)  


MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair and mild (1,2,3,4); periods of rain (5,6,7),fair and very warm (8,9,10. Periods of rain, breezy (11,12,13,14); breezy, cooler with AM freeze (15,16); occasional showers, severe thunderstorms (17,18,19) then turning fair and very warm (20,21,22,23,24,25,26); more showers and thunderstorms (27,28,29,30). 


TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of April. 


FULL MOON: April’s FULL MOON will occur on Monday, April 26th. Because of the many pretty flowers blooming during the month, it has been called PINK MOON. It has been also referred to as FISH MOON because fishing typically improves due to the warming weather. 


SPECIAL NOTES: April Fool’s Day falls on Wednesday, April 1st in 2021. Keep an eye out for practical jokes and pranks that may be coming your way from family, co-workers, and friends.  To learn more about this unofficial holiday of jokes, hoaxes and pranks, go to www.history.com/topics/holidays/april-fools-day. Tax Day is Thursday, April 15th. If you are not ready, file a request for an extension immediately using the form found at www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4868.pdf. Earth Day is observed on Thursday, April 22nd. Put a call into the Earth Day Network at (202) 518-0044 or check out www.earthday.net for some interesting, fun, and easy activities that you and your family can do that will help promote a healthier relationship with Mother Earth! Arbor Day falls on Friday, April 30th. The Arbor Day Foundation’s vision is to help others understand and use trees as a solution to many of the global issues we face today, including air quality, water quality, a changing climate, deforestation, poverty, and hunger. Check out more at www.arborday.org/. 

 

HOLIDAYS: In 2021, Easter is on Sunday, April 4th. Celebrate the resurrection of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, by attending the church of your choice.    

 

THE GARDEN: Now is the time to do some serious Spring “cleaning” in the garden. Trim back dead foliage and gather up winter’s detritus, such as small branches and excess leaves. Trees and shrubs like Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Spiraea, and Viburnums, if planted now, will provide some beautiful late Spring color. To keep your Easter lilies blooming longer, place them in indirect sunlight in a cool room. When the flowers open up, pinch off the yellow anthers. Once your blooms have faded and all danger of frost has passed, remove the lily from its pot and plant it in a sunny spot in the garden. Easter Lilies like lots of water and good drainage. Be sure to mulch the roots of the plants over winter and remove the mulch again in spring. You'll enjoy your Easter Lilies for years to come.

 

THE FARM Best days for planting root crops (7,8); weeding and stirring the soil (25,26,7); planting above-ground crops (1,2); planting root crops (7,8,9) 21,22); harvesting all crops (11,12); planting above the ground crops (28,29); to set hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15); slaughter and butcher meat (22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29); transplanting (22,23,242,5,26,27,28,29);); harvesting and storing of grain (14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21); weaning of animals and livestock (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19).


J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING


”Covering the mistakes of others is not necessarily doing them a favor



APRIL 2021


"No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow"…..Old Proverb

 
MID-ATLANTIC WEATHER WATCH: Fair and mild (1,2), STORMS, cooler (3,4); fair and warmer (5,6,7,8,9) with more STORMS, breezy (10,11,12) then turning fair and chilly (13,14,15,16). Fair and mild (17,18)with yet more STORMS, cooler temperatures (19,20,21);fair and mild again (22,23,24,25) with still more STORMS and windy (26,27,28) returning to fair and mild weather (29,30,31).  


TORNADO WATCH: The Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack sees no tornado activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region during the month of May. 


FULL MOON: The FULL MOON in May occurs on Wednesday, May 26th. While the farmer came to refer to it as MILK MOON because of the noticeable increase in milk produced by dairy cow, many Native American tribes called it FLOWER MOON because of the many flowers that have started to emerge and blossom during this month. The Huron tribes specifically chose to call it BUDDING MOON for the very same reasons!


SPECIAL NOTES: The Gruber Almanack, LLC is excited to announce that its Hagerstown Town and Country Almanack has partnered with PennState Extension of Franklin County, Pennsylvania!  The Extension is a modern educational organization, dedicated to delivering science-based information to people, businesses, and communities to help address problems and help to implement innovative techniques in farming, agricultural, and dairy to improve efficiencies and yields. For more details and the latest PennState Extension articles, go to www.almanack.com/penn-state-agricultural-extension.


HOLIDAYS: Cinco de Mayo is celebrated on Wednesday, May 5th. Mothers are honored on Mother’s Day, Sunday May 9th. She’s your “special lady” and she deserves a nice dinner out, a sentimental card and/or nice flower arrangement, or just a telephone call to say, “I love you”! Rogation Sunday also falls on May 9th with Ascension Thursday following Thursday, May 21st., and Trinity Sunday, on Sunday, May 30th. Memorial Day falls on Monday, May 31st in 2021. This day has been set aside for honoring those who have died serving in our military and to all those who are currently serving today. Their service and sacrifice have protected our precious freedoms and have ensured that our way of life will continue. We should also extend that recognition to include doctors, all health care workers, and all who are deemed essential in this troubled time.


THE GARDEN: It's not too late to fertilize your trees and shrubs. Use a Rhododendron or Evergreen type of plant food to feed evergreens and other acid loving plants like Azaleas and Rhododendrons, Camellias and Junipers, etc. Use an all-purpose garden fertilizer (10-10-10) to feed roses, deciduous shrubs and trees. Be sure to water the fertilizer in thoroughly after it is applied. 


THE FARM: Best for planting root crops (1,2); weeding and stirring the soil (13,14); planting above-ground crops (15,16,17); harvesting all crops (26,27,30,31); best days for setting hens and incubators (1,2,3,4,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,2,31); slaughtering and butchering meat (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18); harvest and store grains 8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17); transplanting (11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18); weaning of small animals and livestock (1,2,3,4,5,26,27,28,29,30,31). 

J. GRUBER’S THOUGHT FOR TODAY’S LIVING:

“Many people whistle while they work, often so to keep from swearing”



MAY 2021